The Backpack Policy

Chyna Anderson

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Students attending Westside Highschool are prohibited from bringing backpacks that aren’t clear or mesh. With good reason, of course. As you may know, Westside (previously known as Forest) has a history of adolescents bringing drugs or weapons on campus.

However, students aren’t allowed to bring backpacks inside of a classroom, regardless of their transparency. There’s little to no risk of a student bringing dangerous objects in a classroom if the bag is see-through, so why aren’t they allowed?

Biology teacher, Christopher Reeves, briefy explained why backpacks are forbidden from working environments. He said they pose a safety hazard, most likely causing children to trip and fall during an evacuation. While this explanation is well within reason, one must consider that several other schools allow backpacks on campus and have yet to report a problem.

A backpack symbolizes education, traveling, and preparedness. Students are expected to have all necessary supplies for the class. It can be difficult to have everything they need when it has to be carried in their hands everywhere they go.

Sure, there are lockers for every student, but teachers fail to take into account the amount of time wasted going all the way to a locker to get whatever item is needed and the small capacity of said locker. Not to mention how unnecessary a locker is when a backpack is much more convenient.

Students walking to or from school usually don’t carry backpacks, opting to use purses or folders. How can one expect something so small to hold all of what they need? It’s illogical.

A student should be allowed to carry a backpack to school. Such policies that go against this are not only a nuisance, but they are also risky toward students and other individuals. A student forced to carry their items could easily leave something behind, causing it to get lost or stolen.

Hopefully, these precedents will change in the near future and positively impact the future generation of high school students.

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